Videos

Remembering the Kokoda track

See also About the Kokoda Track: 1942 and Today

[The sun shines on a valley running through a jungle-clad mountain range.
Title: The Kokoda Track.
Text: Exploring the site of the battle fought by Australians in World War II.

Long rows of white marble military headstones stretch hypnotically across the green lawns of a large, well-maintained cemetery. Small colourful shrubs are planted between the headstones. The thousands of headstones are engraved with military badges and the names and details of the fallen soldiers.
Text: Bomana Cemetery. 19 kilometres from Port Moresby at the southern end of the Kokoda track.

A blanket of thick white cloud shrouds the lower slopes of a jungle valley.
Text: The Battle of Isurava, 26-31 August 1942.
A black and white photo of a smiling dark-haired man appears over the valley.
Text: During this battle, Private Bruce Kingsbury won the Victoria Cross for bravery, losing his life.

A creek winds through thick jungle, its water foaming white over dark rocks.
Text: Eora Creek.
A black-and-white photo superimposed over the trees shows a local man and children carrying a soldier on a stretcher over a rocky creek.

White cloud shrouds mountain peaks.
Text: The Battle of Mission Ridge-Brigade Hill. Efogi 6-9 September 1942.
Aerial footage follows a rugged mountain ridge that's covered with dense jungle.
Text: A week after Isurava, another attempt was made to stop the Japanese advance. Again the Australians were defeated with 87 dead and 77 wounded yet these figures are not a true reflection of the disaster which occurred at Efogi...

Wide, flat marshland is surrounded by rugged mountains.
Text: Myola 2.
A series of black and white photos are superimposed over the landscape. The first shows soldiers filing through long grass. In the second photo a soldier kneels, his head bowed, his arms crossed in front of his body. More soldiers are crouched behind him. The third photo shows a soldier supporting a local woman. The photos fade, revealing the vast green and brown plain.

A road runs between a village and the base of a wide grassy plateau.
Text: Kokoda Village.
The black-and-white photo of a dark-haired officer is superimposed over the village.
Text: In the first engagement at Kokoda on 28 July 1942 the Japanese defeated Lieutenant Colonel Owen's force. Lt Col Owen was struck by a bullet and died the next day. He was the first Australian to receive the American Distinguished Service Cross.

In a plain dotted with trees, grass-covered mounds form a rough E-shape.
Text: The Battle of the Beachheads. Gona, Buna, Sanananda. November 1942-January 1943.
Palm trees fringe a narrow beach of dark sand. A series of black-and-white photos show soldiers and vehicles near tall palm trees. Soldiers aim a machine gun.

A wide creek runs past low buildings and through clustered palm trees toward a bay.

In a black-and-white photo 10 soldiers pose grinning near dark trees.
A photo shows two Australian soldiers with two Japanese prisoners.
Three young soldiers in helmets and crumpled tropical uniforms grin at the camera.
Three Australian soldiers stand sombre-faced near bodies lying sprawled on fallen palm fronds.
A soldier gazes directly into the camera. He is bare-chested and has a light beard. He wears a slouch hat with its brim down.
A soldier wearing only shorts and boots puts flowers by the white cross headstone of Private BS Kingsbury. More white crosses are arranged in long orderly rows.
A large group of soldiers pose near tents.
Text: The War in Papua had begun with Australian retreats from Kokoda in July and August 1942 in the face of the Japanese advance. Driving to within 40 kilometres from Port Moresby, the Japanese retreated. The Australians, now advancing along the Kokoda Track drove the Japanese back, retaking Kokoda on 2 November 1942.]

Bomana lies 19 kilometres from Port Moresby at the southern end of the Kokoda track.
The remains of 3779 Australians and their Allies rest at Bomana.

[Text: Bomana Cemetery.
A white marble headstone is engraved with the Rising Sun badge and the words:

"VX61264 Private. J.A. Ferguson. 2/14 Infantry Battalion. 29th August 1942, Age 22."

In the well-maintained cemetery thousands of identical headstones are arranged in long orderly rows.]

VOICEOVER: This is the grave of Private John Alan Ferguson of Dandenong Victoria. He was 22 years old when he was killed at Isurava on the 29 August 1942. He rests here with 3,778 others. The names of 237 of them are unknown.

Text: The Kokoda Track.
Exploring the site of the battle fought by Australians in World War II.
© Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Australia 2010.
Music © Mark Douglas Williams 2010.]

Sanananda - the last Japanese stronghold to fall.

[See also The Japanese Besieged – the Battle of the Beachheads: Buna, Gona, Sanananda]

[A wide creek lined with palm trees and green fields runs toward the ocean. It passes a group of buildings on stilts. Most have traditional brown roofs. A few have white roofs.]

VOICEOVER: Sanananda, was the very centre of the Japanese base on the north coast of Papua. In 1942, this area was covered by storage sheds, piles of equipment, ammunition dumps, and hospitals. On the beach, the rusty remains of the barges used to bring all this ashore can still be seen.

[Text: The battlefield toward Buna.
Trees dotting a wide grassy plain thicken into forest.]

VOICEOVER: On New Year's Day, 1943, the Australian 2/12 Infantry Battalion, Tasmanians and Queenslanders, charged across this now overgrown airstrip at Buna, and into the heart of the Japanese defences.

'Gona - the northern most of the three Japanese entrenched positions.'

See also The Japanese Besieged-the Battle of the Beachheads: Buna, Gona, Sanananda

[In aerial footage a flat tree-clad landscape stretches to distant mountains. A wide creek winds through thick trees. The brown roofs of buildings are visible through the trees.
Text: Gona village.]

VOICEOVER: In the foreground is Gona Creek and the village of Gona where, in November 1942, 900 Japanese were entrenched with their backs to the sea. The Owen Stanley Range lies in the distance, with Port Moresby beyond.

[Palm trees grow on thick grass fringing the dark brown sand of a beach.]

VOICEOVER: This black-sand beach on the shores of the Solomon Sea, now so tranquil, was, in December 1942, the scene of the Battle of Gona, where the Japanese garrison was destroyed and 220 Australians died.

[The image freezes on a section of beach. On the grassy shore, palm trees tower near a small building.]

‘From Kokoda the track follows the gorge of Eora Creek.’

See also The Tide Turns: Australian advance to Eora: 13-27 October 1942

[In aerial footage, a creek winds through dense green jungle, its water foaming white over the dark rocks.
Text: Eora Creek.]

VOICEOVER: Over many thousands of years, Eora Creek has cut a deep gorge into the Owen Stanley Range. It rises near the crest of the range at Myola and flows north, feeding into the Mambare River near Kokoda. The Kokoda Track follows Eora Creek from Myola to Mambare. And here, where Eora village once stood, it crosses the fast-flowing creek on a bridge made of a few logs tied together.

[The footage freezes on a clearing in the jungle - a grassy plateau overlooking the creek just before it disappears into the trees. Below the plateau, a section of bank is cleared. Beyond the plateau, jungle-clad slopes rise to cloud-covered mountain peaks.]

‘The Isurava battlefield – where Bruce Kingsbury won the Victoria Cross.’

See also Into the Mountains: Falling back to Deniki: 12-14 August 1942

[A blanket of thick white cloud shrouds a valley that runs through a jungle-covered mountain range.
Text: Deniki to Isurava.]

VOICEOVER: Looking south from Deniki towards Isurava, the battlefield is in part covered with low cloud as it is on most days and as it was in late August 1942 when the Battle of Isurava, a Japanese victory, was fought. On both slopes of this gorge, 6,000 Australians, Papuans and Japanese fought for five days. 300 men were killed. one of them was the Kokoda Track's only Victoria Cross winner, Private Bruce Kingsbury.]

‘In 1942 Kokoda airstrip was the only viable airstrip for 100 kilometres.’

See also A Fighting Retreat: First engagement at Kokoda 28 July 1942

[Aerial footage sweeps over a tree-covered plain towards a plantation of palm trees. A long straight strip of flat grass runs alongside the plantation. Nearby, a river curves through the trees. Thick pale cloud shrouds the horizon.
Text: Kokoda airstrip.]

VOICEOVER: Halfway between Port Moresby and Buna is Kokoda airstrip. Built in 1932 to support mining along the Mambare River, the strip is now used by trekkers arriving to walk the Kokoda Track from the northern end or leaving after walking from the southern end.

[Near one end of the airstrip brown-roofed buildings form a U-shape in a clearing. Aerial footage swoops away from the airstrip and follows a narrow road that runs towards low houses clustered among thick trees. Just before it reaches the village, the road curves past steep grassy slopes that lead up to a verdant plateau.
Text: Kokoda Plateau.]

VOICEOVER: In the fighting of 1942, this airstrip was vital ground - the only place where an aircraft could land for 100km in either direction. The army which held it could fly in supplies and reinforcements to their men at the front line. Overlooking Kokoda Village and next to the airstrip, Kokoda Plateau is a natural defensive bastion. When the Japanese first attacked Kokoda soon after midnight on the morning of 29 July 1942, it was held by a small Australian and Papuan force, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel William Owen. Owen was killed here when the Japanese advance surged up the steep sides of the plateau and forced the Australians and Papuans to retreat.

[The wide grassy plateau is dotted with trees and low buildings. On the edge closest to the village, four white monuments, each bearing a plaque, flank three bare white flagpoles.]

‘The Australians air dropped supplies at Myola 2.’

See also Jungle Warfare: The problem of supply

[Aerial footage moves over a the thick jungle covering a long mountain ridge. Beyond the ridge, rolling slopes descend to a vast green plain nestled among tree-clad mountains. The plain is mottled with shades of green and brown. A long strip of pale grass flanks a creek winding through the centre of the plain.]

VOICEOVER: Over this ridge is a sight that seems out of place 2,000m above sea level, in the midst of the rugged Owen Stanley Range. It is Myola 2, a huge expanse of marsh with streams running north, the source of Eora Creek. The Australians realised Myola's suitability for the airdropping of supplies, which otherwise had to be carried all the way from Port Moresby. Transport aircraft swooped low and slow across Myola while packages of food and ammunition were pushed out the door.]

‘The Australians held the high ground overlooking Efogi.’

See also Into the Mountains: Disaster at Efogi 8 September 1942

[Mountains covered in dense jungle roll to the horizon. Aerial footage follows the uneven, rugged line of one mountain ridge.
Text: Mission Ridge near Efogi.]

VOICEOVER: Usually, the Kokoda Track climbs and descends across over row after row of jagged ridges against the grain of the country. Sometimes, as here near Efogi, it follows the line of a ridge crest. On the night before the battle of Mission Ridge-Brigade Hill, the Japanese marched along this ridge from right to left. They used makeshift lamps to find their way. The Australians looking down on them from Mission Ridge saw the line of lights snaking along the crest, but had no weapon with sufficient range to fire on them.

Interview Mick Malone, SAS

Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.2087

Trooper 'Mick' Malone, 3rd Special Air Service Squadron who served in Vietnam between 22 February 1969 and 18 February 1970, discusses his reaction to Australian protestors.

Interview 2 David Williams Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.2362

Ship’s diver David Williams who served in HMAS Vampire discusses his feelings about the discrimination against Vietnam veterans.

Interview 3 Lieutenant Barry Smith, 1st Australian Civil Affairs Unit Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.2144

Civil Affairs Officer Lieutenant Barry Smith returned to Vietnam in 1990. During his visit he was shocked to discover the local impact of the loss of so many South Vietnamese men.

Vietnamese and Australians on joint operation [AWM F04403]

A seven-week joint operation between Delta Company, 6RAR, and the 3rd Battalion, 52nd Regiment of the 18th Army of the Republic of Vietnam Division, ended with a five-day operation in the Nui Thi Vai hills north-west of the Task Force base at Nui Dat, November 1969. Major Mick Gill from Qld commanded Delta Company; Captain Tan was the ARVN Battalion Commander.

Interview 6 Second Lieutenant Dave Sabben, 12 Platoon, D Company, 6RAR Australians at War Film Archive Interview No.2585

Second Lieutenant David Sabben, 6RAR, discusses his response to anti-war protestors.

Interview 5 Second Lieutenant David Sabben 12 Platoon, D Company, 6RAR Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.2585

'National Service was the making of me'. Second Lieutenant David Sabben discusses the positive impact of National Service on his life.

Interview Sabine Erika Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.2529

Sabine Erika grew up with refugees from Nazi Germany and explains that she was strongly opposed to Australia's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Conscripted Gunner John Kinsela Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.2454

Conscripted Gunner John Kinsela, 106 Battery. 4 Field Regiment, served in Vietnam between 11 June 1970 and 4 February 1971. After his discharge from the Army, he competed with the Australian Olympic wrestling team in Munich in 1972. He discovered that at one function in Sydney, his Returned Serviceman's Badge excited more interest than the Olympic Blazer he had worn during the Munich Olympic Games.

Bird Dog

This film focuses on Wing Commander Anthony Powell as he flies a United States Air Force Cessna O-1 ‘Bird Dog’ on a 1967 mission. In this sequence he fuels the aircraft and loads ammunition before taking off. In flight he marks a target and watches as two jets fly in low to bomb the area. [AWM F02719]

No. 2 Squadron RAAF bomber strike in Vietnam

During the Vietnam War No. 2 Squadron gained a reputation for accuracy, lost two aircraft and two men and flew more than 11,500 sorties. The squadron’s contribution was recognised with awards from both the Republic of Vietnam and United States Governments. [AWM F02746]

Dust off, interview with Pilot Officer

'Dust off', interview with Pilot Officer Michael Haxell who was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for two emergency extractions of Australian troops in the face of heavy enemy fire in August 1967. [AWM F04725]

Pilot Officer Michael Haxell was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for two emergency extractions of Australian troops in the face of heavy enemy fire in August 1967. Aged 24 when he began his ten month tour of Vietnam, Haxell was, at the time, 9 Squadron’s youngest pilot. In this clip he speaks to an interviewer about flying casualty evacuations, known as ‘dust-offs’, during 1967. Footage of such operations complement the interview.

Operation Hawkesbury

RAAF helicopter support for Operation ‘Hawkesbury’ In September 1968 No. 9 Squadron helicopters airlifted members of the 1st and 4th Battalions, Royal Australian Regiment (1 & 4 RAR) to an area north of the Task Force base at Nui Dat for Operation Hawkesbury. [AWM F02737]

In September 1968 No. 9 Squadron helicopters airlifted members of the 1st and 4th Battalions, Royal Australian Regiment (1 & 4 RAR) to an area north of the Task Force base at Nui Dat for Operation Hawkesbury. This film shows the assembled infantry running to board the helicopters for the flight to their landing zone and includes interesting shots of the aircraft in flight over the jungle. Iroquois such as these were the workhorses of the Vietnam War, their value in moving troops to and from operations is well documented. In this operation, carried out amidst thick vegetation in which landing zones were few, the infantry were told resupply would be kept to a minimum. Each man carried four days rations, an emergency ration, four full waterbottles and ammunition.

Interview 1 David Williams Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.2362

Ship’s diver David Williams who served on HMAS Vampire.

Interview 5 John O'Callaghan Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.0673

Leading Engineering Mechanic (LEM), John O’Callaghan, RAN, served twice on the gunline as a member of HMAS Hobart’s crew.

Interview 4 John O'Callaghan Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.0673

Leading Engineering Mechanic (LME), John O’Callaghan, RAN, was on board HMAS Sydney for two voyages to Vietnam during 1965. During this interview he discusses the technical aspects of troop carrying, the trip to Vietnam, the crew’s interaction with the troops at sea and the vulnerability of Sydney at anchor in Vung Tau harbour.

Interview 3 John O'Callaghan Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.0673

Leading Engineering Mechanic (LME), John O’Callaghan, RAN, was on board HMAS Sydney for two voyages to Vietnam during 1965. During this interview he discusses the technical aspects of troop carrying, the trip to Vietnam, the crew’s interaction with the troops at sea and the vulnerability of Sydney at anchor in Vung Tau harbour.

Interview 2 John O'Callaghan Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.0673

Leading Engineering Mechanic (LME), John O’Callaghan, RAN, was on board HMAS Sydney for two voyages to Vietnam during 1965. During this interview he discusses the technical aspects of troop carrying, the trip to Vietnam, the crew’s interaction with the troops at sea and the vulnerability of Sydney at anchor in Vung Tau harbour.

Interview 1 John O'Callaghan Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.0673

Leading Engineering Mechanic (LME), John O’Callaghan, RAN, was on board HMAS Sydney for two voyages to Vietnam during 1965. During this interview he discusses the technical aspects of troop carrying, the trip to Vietnam, the crew’s interaction with the troops at sea and the vulnerability of Sydney at anchor in Vung Tau harbour.

Interview 6 John O'Callaghan Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.0673

During John O’Callaghan’s trip to Vietnam, HMAS Sydney called in at the US Naval Base at Subic Bay in the Philippines. Leading Engineering Mechanic O’Callaghan, RAN, provides a vivid description of the unofficial exchanges of uniform between Australian soldiers and sailors and the US servicemen at Subic Bay.

Artillerymen setting up a fire support base.

Artillerymen setting up a fire support base as they erect shelters and manhandle guns into position. Included in the film is an excellent aerial shot of the guns in action. [AWM F04332]

108 Field Battery in action during Operation Paddington in July 1967. [AWM F03896]

This film depicts elements of 108 Field Battery in action during Operation Paddington in July 1967, a ‘hammer and anvil’ operation conducted in conjunction with United States forces aimed at destroying the 274th Viet Cong Regiment. Despite this being the largest operation so far conducted by the Australian Task Force, the Viet Cong managed to slip away into the May Tao hills. The video depicts shirtless gunners in action as they receive target instructions and makes clear the strenuous nature of their work.

Engineers: Vietnam Mine Patrol [AWM F03782]

This brief film shows Australians engaged in the dangerous task of searching for mines on a South Vietnamese road. Engineers sitting on the front of a jeep, one operating a mine detector and the other holding a weapon, eyes rarely straying from the road, check for explosive devices while an APC follows at a safe distance.

Armoured Personnel Carrier damaged by mine [AWM F04272]

This film was taken on Operation Kinghit during December 1968 during which an APC was damaged by a mine dug into a dirt road. The film shows wounded Australians, one being helped into another APC before returning to the Task Force Base for treatment. At the scene of the explosion, Australians study the damage to the APC while others make sure that no other mines are in the vicinity.

Tanks in Operation [AWM F04245]

This piece of footage was shot on Operation Track Duster in October 1968 and shows APCs and tanks moving into ambush positions across sodden fields. The film gives an impression of some of the country over which Australian armoured vehicles operated.

Tanks in Vietnam

Armoured Personnel Carriers and a mine incident. [AWM F04330]

Despite the title, this film focuses mostly on APCs and appears to cover a mine incident during which at least one Australian was wounded. Several men search the ground using mine detectors before calling in a helicopter to land in the mine-free area and evacuate the wounded man.

Rebuilding Binh Ba [AWM F04344]

Almost as soon as the fighting in Binh Ba came to an end, Australian civil affairs workers and engineers moved in to begin rebuilding the shattered village. Members of the 17th Construction Squadron are shown repairing some buildings while others knock down those that were beyond fixing. The film points to the importance of the ‘hearts and minds’ aspects of the war and shows the Australians to have made a considerable effort to repair battle-damaged homes in the aftermath of a vicious battle.

Battle of Binh Ba [AWM F04342]

This brief film covers a number of aspects of the battle of Binh Ba. In some scenes we see Australians working their way through Binh Ba’s ruined houses - the damage inflicted on the village during the battle is made very clear. Later the cameraman focus on the awful scene that followed the battle, a village square in which lie the bodies of a large number of dead enemy troops. We see also a line of Australians, supported by armour, moving towards Duc Trung on the second day of the battle. Taken together these few moments from a battle that lasted several days manage to convey a sense of the terrible fighting that took place in Binh Ba and the cost of that battle to the North Vietnamese, the Viet Cong and villagers.

RAAF Supplies Fire Support Base Coral [AWM F02729]

This film shows a RAAF helicopter resupplying Fire Support Base Coral on 30 May 1968. As the helicopter flies into and out of the base viewers can see something of how Coral appeared at the height of the fighting in the area. The helicopter's second pilot, sporting a full beard, appears to be a member of the Royal Australian Navy Helicopter Flight Vietnam.

Attack repulsed at Australian Base [AWM F04671]

On the morning after an assault against Fire Support Base Coral an Australian cameraman filmed infantrymen clearing the battlefield. Dead bodies lie where they fell and equipment and weapons are strewn about, testament to the ferocity of the attack and the weight of defensive fire. Later, some Australians study the enemy weapons while another considers a bullet or shrapnel hole in his drinking mug.

Interview 2 Second Lieutenant David Sabben , 12 Platoon, D Company, 6RAR Australians at War Film Archive Interview No.2585.

Searching the enemy bodies.

Interview 3 Second Lieutenant David Sabben, 12 Platoon, D Company, 6RAR Australians at War Film Archive Interview No.2585.

The impact of the huge losses on D Company.

Interview 4 Second Lieutenant David Sabben, 12 Platoon, D Company, 6RAR Australians at War Film Archive Interview No.2585.

The long-term effects of the battle on the veterans.

Prime Minister Presents Unit Citation [AWM F04223]

This citation, the highest US award, was presented to Delta Company 6RAR at a parade in Townsville on 18 August 1968, two years after the Battle of Long Tan. The Australian Prime Minister, Mr John Gorton pinned the citation ribbon to 6RAR's regimental colours and congratulated D Company on its award. Present at the ceremony were the Minister for the Army, Mr Phillip Lynch, his wife, and the new American Ambassador to Australia, Mr William Crook with Mrs Crook. Also present were members of D company including Major Harry Smith, MC of NSW and Sergeant Bob Buick, MM, of WA.

Military Cross Presentation [AWM F03833]

Gallantry awards, including a Military Cross, a Distinguished Service Medal, three Military Medals and six Mentions in Despatches were presented to 11 Australian soldiers in a ceremony at Nui Dat, South Vietnam, in January 1967. Among them were nine officers and men of Delta Company 6RAR receiving recognition for their bravery at Long Tan in August 1966.

The former Australian Task Force Commander, Brigadier Oliver Jackson, accompanied by his successor, Brigadier Stewart Graham, presented the awards. Also present was the Task Force's senior RAAF officer, Group Captain Peter Raw. Major Harry Smith, CO of Delta Company, received the Military Cross for his 'leadership, calmness and determination and disregard for personal safety' which inspired his soldiers to fend off much larger enemy forces.

Operation Smithfield (Long Tan) [AWM F03784]

On 19 August 1966, soldiers of Delta Company 6RAR, await reinforcements before returning to the battlefield. Some of their damaged weapons are examined by Private Bryan Reilly of Qld. The men move back into the battle area on armoured personnel carriers and almost immediately find two wounded Australians. On the alert for booby traps and unexploded grenades, the Australians treat wounded enemy soldiers and salvage enemy weapons.

Interview 4 Sergeant Bob Buick Australians at War Film Archive. Interview No.2181

Sergeant Bob Buick, 6RAR, served with 11 Platoon D Company during the Battle of Long Tan. In this section of his interview he recalls his memories of being under enemy fire and, at the same time, explains the difficulty of conveying the personal reality of battle to anyone who wasn't involved.

'30 Viet Cong tunnels' [AWM F04222]

Using a special detector, Australian troops found more than 30 Viet Cong tunnels and underground hides in an area about 4 kilometres south of the Task Force base at Nui Dat. The detector, a radar screen, was pulled over the ground and ‘tunnel rats’ from the Ist Field Squadron Royal Australian Engineers, had the unenviable job of exploring the subterranean chambers. Twenty-five tunnels were blown up during the sweep on 14 August, 1968.

Interview 6 Lieutenant Peter Aspinall Australians at War Film Archive, Interview No.1972

Lieutenant Peter Aspinall, 1st Field Regiment, Royal Australian Artillery, 5RAR, who served in Vietnam from 14 May 1966 until 7 February 1967, discusses routines for night patrols.

The destruction of enemy camps in Phuoc Tuy Province [AWM F04363]

5 RAR troops under their Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Colin Khan, find and destroy three large permanent enemy camps and staging areas.

Viet Cong Camp discovered DPR/TV/983 [AWM F04268]

Troops of C Company, 4RAR, find a recently occupied Viet Cong base camp in the forest about 30 Kilometres from Nui Dat. The camp, capable of holding up to 400 troops, was searched and then destroyed.

Vietnamese and Australians on joint operation [AWM F04403]

A seven-week joint operation between Delta Company, 6RAR, and the 3rd Battalion, 52nd Regiment of the 18th Army of the Republic of Vietnam Division, ended with a five-day operation in the Nui Thi Vai hills north-west of the Task Force base at Nui Dat, November 1969. Major Mick Gill from Qld commanded Delta Company; Captain Tan was the ARVN Battalion Commander.

'Return to Long Tan' [AWM F03877]

Troops of Charlie Company, 6RAR, completed their last operation in Vietnam, Operation Bowen, in May 1967, when they re-visited the village of Long Tan on a search and destroy mission.

Interview 1 Second Lieutenant David Sabben, 12 Platoon, D Company, 6RAR

The realities of battlefield casualties. Australians at War Film Archive Interview No.2585

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